Нелюдських умов утримання у заручниках



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EVIDENCE OF UKRAINIAN CITIZENS WHO WERE HELD CAPTIVE

BY RUSSIAN TERRORIST GROUPS ON THE TERRITORY

OF OCCUPIED REGIONS OF DONETSK AND LUHANSK OBLASTS,

ON INHUMAN CONDITIONS OF DETENTION OF THE CAPTIVES

Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast

1. Yaroslav V. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 36 days)

“…I was held captive in the basement of the former military commissariat in Snizhne Donetsk oblast… The captives were fed once a day (bread and water). There was no medical aid, that’s why the wounded Ukrainian soldiers were suffering badly…”.



Volyn Oblast

2. Serhii B. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 83 days)

“…I was held in the basement of the former Department of the Security Service of Ukraine in Donetsk oblast. I was held there with some other Ukrainian captives, but there was not enough space. When some captives were sleeping, the others could only sit, that’s why they were to have some rest turn by turn. This basement premises was not ventilated and had no windows, we had not enough air. What is more, to exert moral and psychological pressure on the Ukrainian captives, the DPR militants used to turning off the light for several days, so we had to eat (militants ’remains of meal) in darkness. The Ukrainian captives were treated just like animals (threatening shouts, regular beating, intimidation and humiliation)…”.



3. Vasyl B. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 21 days)

“…I was kept in the town of Snizhne Donetsk oblast in a car garage on the territory of the former branch office of the militia. The food of the captives and sanitary hygienic conditions were unsatisfactory. Hunger, lack of any facilities for sleeping, regular beating and psychological humiliation made our captivity unbearable…”.



4. Yurii B. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 23 days)

“…While being in captivity I was kept in the basement premises of the former Security Service of Ukraine department in Donetsk oblast. The conditions were just awful: congestion of people, lack of basic sanitary hygienic conditions, insanitary conditions, regular beating and psychological pressure The majority of the wounded Ukrainian soldiers survived by some kind of miracle, owing to the captured doctors, who devotedly tried to save their lives with available means, as the militants provided no medical treatment…”.



5. Yurii I. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 12 days)

“…During the captivity I was kept in the basement of some plant. They gave us low-calorie food once a day, I and other Ukrainian captives starved. There were no minimal conditions for keeping people over a long period of time. The DPR militants called us «ukrops», who stayed alive to be exchanged for Russian terrorists arrested in Ukraine. The separatists weren’t interested at all in the conditions we were kept in, they gave no medical aid for Ukrainian injured soldiers. They used to repeat that in the case of any complaints, the captives would be shot down…”.



6. Volodymyr K. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 20 days)

“…I was kept in the room of the archives in the building of the former Department of SBU in Donetsk oblast. The captives slept on the 5-stepped shelves of the archives, there were no mattresses, blankets or bedclothes. There was not enough fresh air, as the room was overcrowded and there were no elementary sanitary and hygienic conditions, the atmosphere there was unbearable…”.



7. Anatolii L. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 27 days)

“…I was kept in the city of Snizhne in the garage box at the territory of the former branch office of the militia. The place had no conditions for a long stay of people, we slept on the floor and were given food once every other day…”.



8. Mykhailo M. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 8 days)

“…I was captured and held in the room for keeping weapon in the former militia school in Donetsk city. They treated the Ukrainian captured soldiers like slaves, fed us occasionally (once a day, but not every day). They didn’t provide us with proper medical aid in spite of my numerous requests. There was no toilet and drinking water, I can characterize the living conditions as insanitary…”.



9. Andrii P. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 21 days)

“…In three days after being captured the servicemen of the Armed Forces of RF handed us over to the militants of DPR. The latter transported us to Snizhne town in Donetsk region where we were put into the isolation detention cell of the former regional militia facility. In the cell for 2 persons 7 Ukrainian captives were held, and as a result we slept and sit in turns. During the whole time of my captivity the cell wasn’t cleaned and aired, that is why there was absolute insanitary, dirt and stench. The captives were fed occasionally – once a day, but often we were not fed at all…”.



10. Sviatoslav S. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 125 days)

“…At the beginning I was kept in the open-air cage for working dogs on the territory of the former regional branch office of the militia in town of Snizhne, Donetsk region, and then in some time I was captured in a garage, situated approximately within 500 metres from the office of militia. I slept on the concrete floor on an old mattress. I was fed once a day, but the food was of bad quality and hostages weren’t able to renovate their physique after interrogations and forced labour…”.



11. Yurii S. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 56 days)

“…When in captivity I was held in the basements of the former Regional State Administration of Luhansk and Luhansk regional military commissariat, then I was conveyed to Luhansk customs office (was held in a carriage), and then to one of the basements of an automobile sales centre. There were other 13 Ukrainian hostages with me. We were fed on a pack of Mivina, dried products for quick cooking, and preserved food for animals once per day …”.



12. Taras T. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 182 days)

“…I was held in the basement of the former Donetsk regional department of the Security Service of Ukraine, for the first two days, later on – in the former archive room. But in both cases the conditions were not up to the elementary requirements of an isolation detention facility. In the basement I slept on the concrete floor, in the archive room – on the shelves. It is worth mentioning, that the Russian journalists, who came and shot reportages about “Donetsk militants’ human treatment of Ukrainian captives”, were aware of the inhuman conditions. But these reportages were shot only outside, as the Russians said that “the picture of the basement doesn’t correspond to the plot”…”.



13. Ihor F. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 159 days)

“…I was held in the garage of the former regional branch of the militia in the town of Snizhne, Donetsk oblast. As for the conditions, all I could say is that a garage is the place to keep cars, but not people. Only mentally ill persons or sadists could lock and detain humans for months in such places…”.



14. Valerii Kh. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 82 days)

“…While I was in captivity I was held with other servicemen of the Armed forces of Ukraine in the basement of the former Luhansk regional department of the Security Service of Ukraine. It was a real torture chamber, where captives were not only cruelly beaten, but also exposed to extrajudicial execution. Militants of LPR created such conditions, that Ukrainian captives died of tortures, went mad or altered psychologically. I survived and returned to my family by a miracle…”.



Donetsk Oblast

15. Dmytro P. (serviceman of the State Emergency Service of Ukraine (SESU), was held captive for 42 days)

“…I was captured by the DPR militants at the checkpoint near Donetsk. After being beaten I was taken to a warehouse room. As I later got to know I was taken prisoner as a “rotating pool” – to release DPR militants who were captured by the servicemen of the Armed forces of Ukraine. For the same purpose they captured two more persons, who were kept with me…”.



L’viv Oblast

16. Bohdan R. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held in captive for 22 days)

“…Our mechanized column was attacked by IAG LPR militants from an ambush, two Ukrainian soldiers were killed at place, but I and another serviceman were captured. We were kept at one of the border points in an uninhabited building in the city of Krasnodon. There were no conditions for a long-term detention of people. The captives slept on the floor, didn’t wash themselves during that period of time and were starved to death because of lack of food…”.



Odesa Oblast

17. Oleksander B. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 151 days)

“…I was kept in the basement of the former SSU Department of Donetsk oblast. The conditions were extremely dire, actually, we were slaves. We were poorly fed (once a day we were given half a loaf and some water), we slept on a concrete floor. No treatment for Ukrainian servicemen was provided…”.



18. Dmytro S. (civilian, was held captive for 63 days)

“…I was captured by the representatives of so-called DPR Ministry of State Security under the pretext that I, so to say, was taking photos of the residential buildings in Donetsk. I was kept in the basement of the former SSU Department in Donetsk oblast. In the room the living space of which was 5 m2 , there were from 6 to 12 people. We slept in turn on the floor on the remains of broken furniture…”.



Rivne Oblast

19. Yurii H. (serviceman of the National Guard, was held captive for 119 days)

“…I was held in the basement of the former Donetsk regional department of the SSU. The sanitary conditions were terrible. They fed us on small portions of porridge and water, the Ukrainian captives starved. Necessary medical aid was not provided…’’.



Kherson Oblast

20-21. Oleksandr K. (serviceman of the National Guard, was held captive for 36 days) and Mykola O. (serviceman of the National Guard, was held captive for 70 days)

“…I was held in the cell of the former branch office of the militia in the town of Snizhne. 32 Ukrainian captives were kept in the room fit for five persons. Because of unbelievable overcrowding there was not enough air to breathe, we slept in turn. We were fed on the terrorists’ food scraps. We were not taken to the toilet regularly, depending on the mood of the militants, so we often relieved ourselves in plastic bottles. There were horrible unsanitary conditions in the cell…”.



22. Serhii B. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 6 days)

“…All period of my captivity I spent in the basement of the former militia building, where they fed the captives only on dried crusts. They refused to give us drinking water, did not allow to visit the toilet and left our injured fighters without medical aid. LPR militants noted that they didn’t see any need in taking care of the captives, as if there was no swapping of the captives in the next few days, they would shoot us…”.



23. Leonid K (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 5 days)

“Together with other Ukrainian captives I was held in the basement of one of the private houses in Luhansk after being taken prisoners. We didn’t have any elementary sanitary conditions, there was neither light nor windows in the room, the captives were held in the dark. We were fed once a day on terrorists’ food remains. We eased ourselves according to the schedule, which the militants laid down.”



Ternopil Oblast

24. Vitalii V. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 20 days)

“…Together with other captives I was held in the car boxes, where it was impossible to stay for a long time. We were fed irregularly on poor quality food, we didn’t have any tableware. The militants didn’t meet any sanitary hygienic conditions of holding the captives. In fact, the wounded Ukrainian soldiers were left for the mercy of fate with no medical aid provided”.



25. Ivan H. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 47 days)

“...When in captivity I was held in the town of Snizhne, Donetsk oblast, in the regional branch office of the militia detention ward. There were so many captives (more than 200) that there was even no place to sit. We slept in turns on the concrete floor. Militants made captives work from 6 a.m. till the late evening: the captives were demining fields (at the risk of their lives, without special equipment), scrapping damaged military equipment, and clearing the ruins. For any fault (for example, slow working) the captives were beaten violently...”.



26. Volodymyr M. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 76 days)

“…We didn't get enough food; also they didn't give us any medical aid. When in captivity we were systematically beaten and abused...”.



27. Fedir T. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 211 days)

“…I was held in captivity in the basement of the former Donetsk SSU Department. At that time there had already been 50-60 Ukrainian soldiers, including the injured ones. We slept on the concrete floor, we were fed on the food remnants of militants’ meal. We were forced doing different kinds of work (taking terrorists and Ukrainian soldiers’ bodies out of the ruins of Donetsk airport, reconstructing destroyed buildings)…”.



Kyiv Oblast

28. Dmytro B. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 4 days)

“…I was taken captive during the defense of Debaltsevo, was kept in the basement of the so-called “military commandant's office of LPR” (it was on the territory of Luhansk city Zoo). The basement was packed with Ukrainian captives and civilian hostages, there was not any opportunity to lie down or even move there. We all sat on the concrete floor and we even slept sitting on it. In fact we weren’t given any food, only hard biscuits were provided. We managed to survive just due to the help of the Zoo staff, they brought us food. Our injured comrades didn’t get any treatment; the medical assistance of LPR militants was just in bandaging…”.



29. Oleksandr D. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 118 days)

“…The captives were kept in the basement of the former SSU department in Donetsk office. There were not any basic conditions for people to stay there, we slept on a concrete floor, they did not give us any food for the first three days, then once a day they gave us a loaf of bread for 15 hostages and 100 grams of soup (the DPR militants added stones to it). The hostages were beaten every day and suffered psychological cruelty…”.



30. Leonid K. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 33 days)

“…During the first week we were kept in a basement; they gave us no food, only some water. I was wounded, but medical aid was not provided. Then we were transported to the basement of the former SSU department in Donetsk office, where the conditions in which hostages were kept were also unbearable…”.



31. Oleksandr K. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 190 days)

“…Our group of four got into an ambush while we were on combat mission. When two of my comrades were killed, Russian militants made us give ourselves up. I was kept in the basement of “Tornado” café for the first three months, and then I was transferred to the garage of the former Donetsk municipal employment office. We were given some awful food once a day. Sometimes we were not given anything to eat at all for several days. There were not any sanitary facilities; medical aid was not provided at all, though we needed it…”.



32. Dmytro K. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 278 days)

“…We were kept in the basement (air-raid shelter) of the former SSU department in Donetsk office. The conditions we were kept in were awful – congestion of the hostages, absence of sleeping conditions (there were only 11 two-tier beds for 122 hostages), cold, hunger tortures, lack of drinking water (50 liters a day for 122 hostages), regular psychological abuse, beatings and tortures, intimidation with execution and threats to kill our relatives. While in captivity I was interrogated and had several ribs, 2 left hand fingers and all my toes broken; militants also broke my left foot and chest, damaged my kidneys. The hostages were tortured by Russian terrorists with call-names “Adrenalin”, “Rulet”, “Baton”, “Zhora”, “Greshnik”, “Nick”, tortures were managed by “Molchun”, “Zayats”, “David”…”.



33. Volodymyr L. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 118 days)

“…At first for a month and a half I was kept in the basement of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department office, and then we were transferred to Ilovaisk. There we were confined in the shooting gallery of the local police office. We slept in turns on the plank beds (as there were not enough planks for all the hostages), once a day we were given some food – 2 spoonfuls of porridge and one loaf of bread for 10 persons, we had to drink sewerage water…”.



34. Volodymyr M. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 38 days)

“…I was kept in a pit for some days, and then the militants of the so-called DPR transferred us to the basement of the former local police office in Horlivka, Donetsk oblast. The conditions were awful; the hostages were tortured and abused psychologically. We lived like slaves – without proper sanitary conditions, without any right for a legal advice, we were made to starve…”.



35. Yevhen N. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 119 days)

“…While in captivity I was kept in the basement of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department office and then in the basement of the former local transport police office in Ilovaisk. The conditions of confinement were extremely poor: a lot of captives (111 people) were kept in small rooms of the basement, which was not made suitable for living. There was no sleeping accommodation, the electric light was always on, the humidity was very high, the basement was packed with people, there was no heating in winter. Moreover, there was only one tap with cold running water for all the captives, and no free access to the toilets. Ukrainian captives were treated only with iodine and cardiac medication. We were given food on the wardens’ discretion – once a day or no food at all. Besides, militants often added petrol or diesel fuel to our food…”.



36. Vladyslav P. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 40 days)

“…All the time I was confined in a basement which had no proper conditions. The wounded and sick hostages were not provided with medical aid, the captives were made to starve (we were given food once a day or even once every two days). Militants combined psychological abuse with cruel tortures – the captives were beaten regularly, tortured with electric current, threatened to be executed…”.



37. Dmytro R. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 84 days)

“…I was kept in a solitary cell of the former police detention center in Snizhne, Donetsk oblast. There were six of us there so we had to sleep and sit in turns. During the first week in captivity we were given one spoonful of porridge a day, and then the ration was… doubled. Ukrainian captives starved, suffered from lack of fresh air, unsanitary conditions, regular tortures and psychological pressure…”.



38. Stanislav T. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 13 days)

“…I was kept in the basement of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department (there were 70 other hostages there). We slept on the concrete floor covered with wood boards; they fed us once a day – it was some watery soup in which they added diesel fuel. They also gave us some slices of bread, but the terrorists scattered them on the floor – they enjoyed watching the hostages gathering the bread. There were entirely insanitary conditions, disgusting smell (the prisoners had to go to the toilet without toilet paper; the toilet became clogged, so we had to relieve natural functions right into the sewage system)…”.



39. Oleksii F. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 176 days)

“…I was kept in the building of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department. They kept us (110 Ukrainian hostages) in the basement; food, sanitation conditions and medical aid were bad. For Russian terrorists, Ukrainian prisoners were just “human commodity” which could be swapped for money or for their henchmen who were captured in Ukraine…”.



40. Oleh Kh. (civilian, was held captive for 9 days)

“…I was captured by militants of the so-called DPR, who accused me of being a member of the secret subversive group of the Armed forces of Ukraine. I was kept in the basement of the former state enterprise “Artemvuhillia” in Horlivka together with 72 other people (Ukrainian war prisoners, civil hostages, and arrested local residents whom militants accused of committing crimes). The hostages were kept in the basement where there were no accommodation facilities – we slept, sat and ate on the concrete floor; there were no household items, such as chairs, tables, or beds. We ate once a day – just a slice of bread and a spoonful of porridge. The hostages had to drink utility water from the toilet instead of drinking water…”.



41. Viacheslav Sh. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 143 days)

“…During my first two months in captivity I was held in the basement of the former enterprise “Nova Poshta”; then I was taken to the so-called DPR commandant's office in Donetsk. The hostages were fed once a day; the basements were dirty and cold. We slept on the floor covered with wood boards. They let us go out to the toilet only in the morning, during the day we had to relieve natural functions into plastic bottles which were beside us…”.



42. Serhii D. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 57 days)

“…I was taken prisoner being badly wounded (shrapnel wound of the stomach); I stayed in Donetsk hospital #21. After my admission to hospital the medical staff of the hospital said that they didn’t have any medicines “to treat the wounded ukrop”. Volunteers from Kyiv Oblast bought the necessary medicines and gave them to my father. Despite being badly wounded, I was interrogated several times by members of the so-called DPR Ministry for State Security; they accused me of killing Donbass civilians, and tried to take me out of the hospital. My father didn’t let them do it (he stayed in the hospital with me); he told them that international human rights advocacy groups had been informed about my grave condition, so in case of my abduction the foreign representatives would start an active awareness-raising campaign…”.



43. Victor L. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 35 days)

“…I was wounded during the combat with pro-Russian terrorists in Donetsk airport; my comrades took me to hospital in Donetsk (June 2014). However, on the following day after my admission to hospital some unknown people stormed into the hospital and took me away from it to the basement of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department. While I was there, I didn’t receive the needed medical aid; they only gave me “brilliant green” and some pills for stomach ache. Basic sanitary conditions for keeping people (wounded people, in particular) were lacking in the basement…”.



44. Valentyn L. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 122 days)

“…During my first two and a half months in captivity I was kept in the basement of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department; then I was taken to Ilovaisk to the basement of the local unit of the so-called “DPR Ministry for State Security”. In both places there were no basic sanitation conditions for keeping people; we were never taken outside for a walk; they gave us soup with diesel fuel added to it (in Donetsk); in Ilovaisk the militants added coal-dust to the food of the hostages on purpose…”.



45. Oleksandr M. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 20 days)

“…I suffered wounds of arms and legs when I was taken in captivity by servicemen of RF Armed forces (our armored reconnaissance vehicle was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, which caused the explosion of the ammunition). At first, I was taken to Donetsk Regional Hospital (I stayed in the hospital for one day), where I underwent an operation. Right after the operation, despite my grave condition, DPR militants confined me in an automobile garage and chained me to the wall. I stayed there with a sack on my head for about a day at freezing temperature. Then I was taken to the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department, where I stayed till I was released from captivity. As I didn’t receive proper medical aid in captivity, there developed diapyesis of my right limb which had been operated on; this lead to recurrent operation after my release from captivity…”.



46. Valerii N. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 119 days)

“…I was kept in the basement of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department. I was not taken outside for a walk during first two months of captivity; they didn’t give me any food during first five days, later they gave me something resembling soup once a day, but they added diesel fuel and sand to it. After such “meal” many hostages developed vomit and severe stomach ache. I can’t say anything about the sanitation conditions, because there were none...”.



47. Maksym F. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 155 days)

“…I was kept in the basement of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department. The confinement conditions were awful; the hostages suffered from cold and starved; they were given food once or twice a day (a slice of bread and 100 grams of porridge); the prisoners had to drink utility water from the toilet instead of drinking water; there was no medical aid. There were more than 100 hostages together in the basement, while there was sleeping accommodation just for 30 people there…”.



48. Maksym A. (serviceman of the National Guard of Ukraine, was held captive for 119 days)

“…While in captivity, I was kept in the former bomb shelter of the SSU Donetsk Regional Department, seized by terrorists. I was there with 109 other Ukrainian prisoners. We were given food once a day; militants added diesel fuel to the food (after eating it we developed severe stomach aches and vomit). There was no ventilation in the basement, the room was not aired; the hostages often fainted due to lack of oxygen…”.



49. Viacheslav H. (employee of the Ministry of Interior of Ukraine, was held captive for 90 days)

“…After being taken captive I was kept in some pit for 3 days, then they took me to a basement in a private house. There they took my clothes off till I was in my underwear, put a bag on my head and tied my arms together. There was no ventilation there, so I was on the verge of dying because I couldn’t breathe properly. Some time later they kept me in the former bomb shelter of the SSU Donetsk Regional Department. The hostages were given food once a day – just a slice of bread and half a cup of porridge. The room was not aired, there was no ventilation in the basement; we were not taken out for a walk. We eased ourselves in the same room where we were kept (there were 3-litre bottles for that purpose). While in captivity, I suffered from active gastric ulcer, but in spite of my severe pains and numerous requests, militants didn’t give me any medical help…”.



50. Vitalii K. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 128 days)

“…After being taken captive by Russian paratroopers, at first we were taken to Rostov oblast, Russian Federation, and the following day we were handed over to the militants of the DPR illegal armed group. Ukrainian officers were separated from soldiers and sergeants; they were taken to Donetsk and confined in the basement of the former SSU Donetsk Regional Department. The total number of hostages was 140 people; they all were in the same room, crowded and crammed. The food was bad (about 100 grams of porridge per one person). Sanitation conditions were bad, too; the room was neither aired nor cleaned. The wardens took the prisoners out to the toilet only once in several days. Medical aid to the wounded was given by a captive Ukrainian military doctor…”.



51. Hryhorii Sh. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 28 days)

“…Right after being captured, I was deliberately put into the basement of the so-called “DPR commandant’s office in Snizhne” where they kept DPR militants arrested for lack of discipline. When the latter found out that I was a serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, they started beating me almost day and night. On the forth day, when I was in grave condition as a result of the beating, I was confined in an iron container the size of which was 1 by 2 meters, where I stayed all alone for more than 20 days…”.



52. Vladyslav R. (serviceman of the Armed forces of Ukraine, was held captive for 39 days)

“…Early in July 2014 I was commissioned from the town of Maryupil to the town of Bila Tserkva. During the stop of the passenger train in Donetsk, armed terrorists from the illegal armed group “Vostok” approached and searched me. When they found my military card, commission warrant, and the Ukrainian passport, they beat me severely and then arrested me. I was taken to the former military base of the Interior force which had already been seized by terrorists. They beat me again there, put a mask on my face, and chained to a radiator. There were two other hostages there, whom I don’t know. During three days we were not allowed to talk, ease ourselves; they didn’t give us any food or drinks, and we were tortured from time to time. Later we were transferred to another room where there were about 25 Ukrainian captives. One of the leaders of the illegal armed group “Vostok” whose call-name was “Odesa” interrogated me and other hostages many times. He told us that he was a former officer of the Armed forces of Ukraine and that he lived in Odesa. It was him who threatened to torture Ukrainian hostages and made them say lies about the Armed forces of Ukraine during the interviews…”.




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Нелюдських умов утримання у заручниках iconДжмент за умов трансформаційних інновацій: виклики, реформи, досягнення матеріали міжнародної наукової конференції 10-12 травня 2007 року Частина ІІ суми 2007

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